Manuka

Exhibition Opening 6pm Thursday 9th November

 

Exhibition Opening 6pm Thursday 26th October

In this exhibition of new paintings, Brooke explores how flat geometric patterning can conjure illusory optical effects. Her carefully orchestrated colour combinations create illusions of three-dimensional space and fugitive colours that resolve and dissolve as the viewing distance changes. These abstract gouache paintings encourage the viewer to move around the gallery, to discover the ‘tipping point’ at which illusions of colour and space appear and disappear.

 

Exhibition Opening 6pm, Thursday 12th October

2017 marks the 40th anniversary of the ANU School of Art & Design. Over these four decades the school has been called home by thousands of artists of all ages and stages of their careers, from all over the world.

Over two separate shows two weeks apart, ­­­­­­­­­Ruby Honours 1 + 2 aims to celebrate this rich history by exhibiting just some of the many highlights from recent and current Honours students across the many different media that the school excels in today.

Image: Christine Appleby Walking the Shore (detail) (2017), cashmere, cotton, linen, monofilament thread, silk, stainless steel wire and wool, 1550 mm x 1300 x 100 mm (photo credit David Munday)

 

Closing Event 3pm Saturday 7th October

2017 marks the 40th anniversary of the ANU School of Art & Design. Over these four decades the school has been called home by thousands of artists of all ages and stages of their careers, from all over the world.

Over two separate shows two weeks apart, ­­­­­­­­­Ruby Honours 1 + 2 aims to celebrate this rich history by exhibiting just some of the many highlights from recent and current Honours students across the many different media that the school excels in today.

Image: Zoe Brand What happens after this? (2015), 16 colour images, ABS plastic display, 300 x 450 x 300mm (photo credit Andy Mullens)

 

Drip pOp is part of a continuing investigation into the relationships between painting, cartoon animation, and the body.

These new works explore elements of installation to speak to our body and it's relationship to space. They explode beyond the boundaries of 'the frame' - expanding, stretching and distorting with tension and gravity. Optical patterning and devices are used in juxtaposition with materiality to playfully evoke a sense of contradiction, while also creating a connection between our own bodily sensations and the cartoon form.

Drip pOp aims to involve the viewer’s active participation in the work through exploring and testing space and illusion through movement.

 

Images that have been redeemed through painting consists of eleven images that attempt to make the viewer uncomfortable in some way. There are two works with amusing biblical quotes about rocks, the US Capitol in Washington, real estate billboards, images of ears, a chemistry beaker and two referencing Queen Victoria which Rowell describes as "a horrible choice of subject matter found in the War Memorial". His subjects are selected because they don't make sense in the context of 21st century art. Thus the exhibition is a process of image redemption through through tone and colour. Dubious subjects are presented anew, with the heavy layering of colour that Rowell has become known for.

Image: James Rowell, Queen Victoria, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 75 x 60cm; courtesy of the artist

 

Reverse Archaeology looks at how the layers of life stick to us, and our identities are formed through the accumulation of experience. Rejecting the drive to excavate, analyse and dissect, this work embraces messy and imperfect processes of growth. Our history may be hidden beneath the surface we show to the world, but we hold a geological record. In these layers and their shifts, transitions and disjuncts, we are many different people at once. We carry our past selves within us into the future.

Image: Jacqui Malins, Untitled 2017

 

Between Wash Cycles depicts petrified silences existing in abstract space. Amidst thought and consciousness there exists a suspended space of silent non-thought. By interrupting the fabric of the paper, Between Wash Cycles seeks to detail this void.

If a photograph is an index to a part of our history, how do we index the lost moments? Through the manipulation of the paper surface and it’s evolution into an everyday object, a patina is formed through washing and ironing, sanding and varnishing. The photographic recollection now eroded is embellished by practising the necessary maintenance actions which delineate human experience.

Image: Caitlin Kozman, Untitled 2017

 

Styling the Distributed Body explores how the Internet influences present day life and what ever-increasing disembodiment means for dressing and presenting our physical selves. Can fashion move away from dressing the body? Looking at texture and function rather than the new technologies, these artists are interested in what an embodied future looks and sounds like. This exhibition is curated by Angus McGrath and features work by Grace Blake, Mimi Fairall, Danielle Karlikoff, Julia Thwaites and Darcy Wedd.

Image: Grace Blake, Bound (prototype), 2017; courtesy of the artist

 

Frontman is a solo exhibition by emerging local artist Campbell Chalmers. Based around hardcore music, the energy and passion of performance and creativity through this type of musical expression. The works look into the psyche and motivations of the hardcore audience and how aggressive and violent music and performance can have a cathartic effect for both performers and audiences at hardcore shows. The selection of prints and drawings highlight both the outward energy and inward reflection of the emotions of those involved in hardcore music.

Image: Hit your friends, 2017, etching; courtesy of the artist

 

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